Southern Africa Bush Tails

Tswalu Kalahari – September 2013

Meet Tswalu’s new meerkat habituator
Introducing Saralé Bock, the new and very enthusiastic meerkat habituator at Tswalu! Saralé, also known as Skippy, joined Tswalu recently when her partner Travis took a position as a field guide here. She will be supplying us with regular updates on the goings-on at the meerkat colonies because her job involves spending as much time with them as possible so that they learn to accept human company. Tswalu’s guests and researchers can then visit the colonies without being seen as a threat or a danger.

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This is what she says about herself:

I grew up in what used to be a one-horse town and has now grown into the metropolis of Worcester in the Western Cape of South Africa. It was a wonderful childhood – our days were spent catching frogs and housing tadpoles, building forts on the farmlands across from where we lived and making go-carts out of anything we could get our hands on. Weekends would be spent on friends’ farms riding horses, or sometimes sheep, camping in the Hex River Valley mountains under the stars, and canoeing down the Breede River. It was what most would call a wholesome upbringing.

When I left school I qualified through the International Academy of Health and Skin Care in Cape Town as a skin care therapist.

Health has always been of great interest to me and I have spent most of my working life working with children, as I believe that we should invest more time and energy in giving them the tools they need to make a positive impact.

I have many goals and aspirations but working with children and animals in a healthy environment is my ultimate goal.


I have recently begun a journey in yoga which I feel will be key to achieving this goal and am currently working with the children at Tswalu’s pre-school Tshameka once a week doing basic poses and helping to create body awareness in them.

We are looking forward to her posts!

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